Beaded Lucet Cord Lariat

Sep 5, 2017 7:58:32 AM

Beaded Lucet Cord Lariat Necklace

There are so many ways to bead a lucet cord. My book, Learn to Lucet covers 2 different methods, but those two are just the tip of the iceberg.

In this cute necklace project, I show yet another way to create a beaded cord, this time with a beaded gimp cord.

I used scrap yarn and beads that I had laying around the house for this project. I love it when I create something new and fun to wear with components that had just been laying around collecting dust.

Scroll down below to see how I made it.


MATERIALS

For the cord:

DK Weight scrap yarn

Size 6/0 Seed Beads

Lucet

Steamer

 

To complete the lariat:

(2) beads with hole large enough to accommodate 4 strands of your DK yarn

(2) jump rings

Tapestry needle

Big Eye beading needle

(2) head pins

Round nose pliers

Beads of your choice to thread onto headpins to create the lariat dangles

Beaded Gimp Lucet Cord

 

Step 1- Make Beaded Gimp Cord: I made a 54” beaded gimp cord. To make the cord, I made a cord with 1 gimp with a small tweak to the process: I strung beads onto my gimp cord before using it.

I used the same yarn for both the gimp and the main cord. Since I use the no-turn method to make my cord and I followed a simple beading pattern.  Every other time I brought my gimp to the back, I scooted a bead up to be caught on the side of the lucet cord facing me.  In this way my beads are evenly spaced on every other strand facing the front of the work. One other key thing I did was to leave a 4” starting and ending tails for use later on when beading the ends.

 

Unblocked Beaded Lucet Cord

 

Step 2 - Block the cord: Don’t fret if your cord looks a little scraggly when it just comes off your lucet.  

 

Eurosteam blocking

 

Hit your cord with a little steam (my favorite is the EuroSteam) and any uneven stitches will normalize.

 

Blocked lucet gimp cord

 

If you are new to blocking or steam blocking, read my primer.

 

Beaded lucet cord end 

Step 3 - Start the beaded dongle: Using a big-eye beading needle, I threaded both strands of cord end through a small bead with a hole large enough to accommodate 4 strands total.

Beaded lucet cord end 2

 

Step 4 - Add jump ring: Thread the ends through the jump ring and then back up through the bead you added in step 3.


Lucet cord with jump ring

 

Step 5 - Finish attaching jump ring: Pull the ends of the lucet cord so that the bead and jump ring you added lie snug to the end of the lucet cord. Use your tapestry needle to weave the ends in through the lucet cord. Repeat on the other side.

 

Beaded Dangles for lucet cord 

Step 6 - Create dangles: Add beads of your choice to a head pin and attach them with round nose pliers to the jump ring.  Complete this for both ends of the lucet cord. I chose two different lengths of head pins and different combinations of beads for each end of the necklace.

 

Lariat Knot 

Step 7 - Carefully tie a knot : Hold the ends of the lariat together so that the bead side is facing you and there are no twists in the cord. Tie an overhand knot carefully so that the beaded side of the cord remains facing you to create an opening of about 38”. This will allow you to wear the lariat wrapped twice around your neck. Leave different length cord ends to hang below the knot, mine are 3 ½” and 7” (not including beaded dangles). Thread a length of the same yarn through your tapestry needle. Try on the necklace to make sure that you are able to fit the necklace part of the cord over your head then double-wrap over your head once more.  If you can’t do the double wrap, modify the position of your knot accordingly.

Have you worked beaded lucet cord yet? What have you made? Post photos and links in comments.

_________________________________________________________________________________________


Learn to Lucet

The most comprehensive guide to this ancient tool yet published!

Do more with the yarn you already have! Learn to use this ancient Viking cording tool to make strong and very sturdy cords that you can use in so many ways.

Make your knit and crochet projects even better. Use them to make drawstrings, lacings, buttons and embellishments for your knit and crochet projects. Also make jewelry, designer shoelaces, home improvement hacks and more with these strong cords.

Author Jennifer Hansen teaches you 6 fundamental cord types and give you full instructions for 8 fun, easy and useful lucet projects.

Learn more.

Comments | Posted in Techniques & How To By Jennifer Hansen

How to crochet a puff stitch around a post

 

Have you seen my Valladolid shawl design?

 

It's a top-down shawl design that's got enough spice to keep things interesting, but it's got meditative portions where you can go on stitching autopilot as well. It's a fun project and it features an unusual spin on one of my favorite stitches--the puff stitch.

 

Usually, puff stitch is worked into a stitch in the previous row.

 

But in this design, puff stitch is worked around the post of the double crochet stitch just worked on the very same row! 

 

Here are the instructions for making this interesting stitch:

1. Ch 3 after the double crochet you've just made.  You need at least 2 or 3 chains to create space for the puff stitch you are about to make.

2. Yarn over, then insert your hook from the front to the back in the space to the right of the post of the double crochet stitch you will be working around.

3. Yarn over, pull up a loop. (3 loops on hook).
 

4. Yarn over, insert your hook in the same spot as step #2, yarn over, pull up a loop. (5 loops on hook).
 

5. Repeat step #4. (7 loops on hook).
 

6. Repeat step #4. (9 loops on hook).
 

7. Yarn over, pull through all loops on hook.
 

8. You are done!  Work at least one chain stitch to secure the puff or follow directions in pattern.

 

If you're a video person, here's the stitch in action:

Comments | Posted in Techniques & How To By Jennifer Hansen

Lucet Hearts and Valentines

 

Valentine's Day is coming and it's a great time to pick up the lucet.  Why?

Frequently when we're beginners at something, the projects that really attract us are beyond our skill level. With Valentine's Day approaching, here's a chance to use your lucet to do a super fast and easy project.

It's thoughtful, supremely giftable and sure to be worn on the day it's given! It's a really easy way to make your special people feel totally special: What's better at showing you care than a handmade heart? And what better project for a beginner with a lucet?

Even if you don't already have a lucet, you can easily make one with things you have around the house. This is such a quick and fun way to explore a new technique and make something useful for gifting.

Megan has a great (and super simple) tutorial on how to turn an 8" lucet cord into a heart. She also provides 5 different ideas for using those hearts to create Valentines and decorations. I couldn't resist giving it a try and experimenting with different yarns from my stash.


lucet cord yarns

I raided my stash for different red yarns and made myself a few hearts.  I made four hearts in less than an hour and it was really fun to see how different yarns worked up into very different cords. (I was actually on a conference call while I was making the hearts and it made that meeting so much more rewarding!)

red lucet cords for hearts in different yarns



I used the Basic Turn Cord (free tutorial or learn how on Day 2 of the 7 Day Lucet Challenge) but I could have easily also used the Basic No Turn Cord.  It's just personal preference, the results would be the same.

I used yarns I don't usually use, including a novelty yarn and a thick and thin yarn, and the resulting cords were fun to see. The easiest yarn to use was the plied merino. It was springy and bouncy and the loops felt almost elastic around the lucet horn.  But as far as finished results, I thought the thick and thin and novelty yarns were really fun.


Lucet cord valentine heart pin

Megan has some great ideas for what to do with the hearts. I made pins with mine.  Now that I'm finished, I'm thinking these would have been even more impressive with a few beads worked in as well.  That's a project for next year!

Don’t know how to lucet? I teach a free, 7 day online challenge, in just minutes a day you can conquer this simple technique in only a week.

_________________________________________________________________________________________


Learn to Lucet

The most comprehensive guide to this ancient tool yet published!

Do more with the yarn you already have! Learn to use this ancient Viking cording tool to make strong and very sturdy cords that you can use in so many ways.

Make your knit and crochet projects even better. Use them to make drawstrings, lacings, buttons and embellishments for your knit and crochet projects. Also make jewelry, designer shoelaces, home improvement hacks and more with these strong cords.

Author Jennifer Hansen teaches you 6 fundamental cord types and give you full instructions for 8 fun, easy and useful lucet projects.

Learn more.

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Comments | Posted in Techniques & How To By Jennifer Hansen

I Made a Swank Pair of Lucet Shoelaces

Jan 12, 2017 12:00:38 PM

Lucet Shoelaces

 

I have a much-loved pair of Fluevog shoes that needed a new pair of shoelaces.  

And since I'm a girl with a lucet, I've got a handy way to whip up a pair of pretty shoelaces whenever I please. I also have magic powers in color-matching my laces to my shoes as long as I can find the right yarn color. (Try to find a full array of colored shoe laces for sale in the length and style that you need. Not going to happen!)  

I felt like keeping the look of these shoes classic and versatile. In this case black yarn was a pretty easy color to get a hold of. The sheen and weight of Lucci Rayon was perfect for my trusty heels.

 

Lucet in action

 

I was lucky enough to be taking a cruise when my shoelace-making activity was going on.  Here's my view while luceting and enjoying a prosecco. Wish this could be my view every day!

I used the Basic Turn Lucet Cord worked to the length of the original shoelaces.


Shoelace Tips

 

Then I also used pliers to attach these shoelace tips (called aglets) to give my laces an extra-fancy finishing touch.

Got any shoelaces that need replacing? Make yourself something fancy!

Don’t know how to lucet? I teach a free, 7 day online challenge, in just minutes a day you can conquer this simple technique in only a week.

_________________________________________________________________________________________


Learn to Lucet

The most comprehensive guide to this ancient tool yet published!

Do more with the yarn you already have! Learn to use this ancient Viking cording tool to make strong and very sturdy cords that you can use in so many ways.

Make your knit and crochet projects even better. Use them to make drawstrings, lacings, buttons and embellishments for your knit and crochet projects. Also make jewelry, designer shoelaces, home improvement hacks and more with these strong cords.

Author Jennifer Hansen teaches you 6 fundamental cord types and give you full instructions for 8 fun, easy and useful lucet projects.

Learn more.

Tags:

Comments | Posted in Techniques & How To By Jennifer Hansen

How to Edge a Stashbuster Blanket

Oct 28, 2016 4:13:21 PM

Crochet a stash buster blanket

 

I’ve made about 20 Stash Buster Blankets over the last 10 years or so.  I absolutely love them because they’re like painting with my stash yarn. They are made with the odds and ends of left over and forgotten yarns that I can't bring myself to donate but never seem to use either. 

Usually I use yarn that I would never want to wear: eyelash yarn for example.  But they look fun as home decor.  (And I still have a ton of stash eyelash yarn that’s a decade old!)

Last year I moved from a cold place to a warm place (Hello Florida!!!).  I needed a new throw for the couch. Something lighter than the blankets I used to make in California. And in colors reflecting my new sub-tropical attitude.

I raided my stash for yellows, oranges and little pops of pink and red.  If you're familiar with my Stash Buster blanket design, you know it’s based on my 3 Color Tunisian Technique. You're always switching between 3 yarns as you stitch the project. These yarns can be single strands or many strands held together.  The key is that you are working with 3 "groups" of yarn.

I've gotten so many question over the years on how I choose my colors. My favorite blankets all had a "main yarn" that contrasted with the rest of the changing colors and textures. This main yarn (or yarns!) provided a backdrop of continuity for all the change in the rest of the blanket.  So when planning yarns for my current project, choosing this “continuity yarn” and making sure I had enough of it was a critical first step.

Let me explain what this means by showing my yarn choices for each of the 3 "yarn groups" in the project.


homespun

Yarn Group 1

I used a single strand of a bulky yarn here - Lion Brand Homespun to be exact.  This is one of my “continuity yarns” and I use it throughout the blanket as the only strand in Group 1. In fact, I only had one ball in my stash, so I went out and bought 2 more just to make sure I had enough yarn to last for the whole project.

It’s not a yarn I love and I’ve been really disappointed by how it frays and pills with wear. But -  when combined with several yarns in a blanket like this, that problem just isn’t that distracting or obvious. It’s a great low-budget “backdrop yarn” for this kind of project.

other yarn  

Yarn 2

I had enough white eyelash yarn to use throughout the project, so this is one of my “continuity yarns” as well.

I hold it always with another strand of orange yarn that changes as I use up my stash.  The effect is that this group of yarn changes subtly as I work since one strand is always the same while the other changes.

 

Yarn group 3  

Yarn Group 3

I hold 3 strands of yarn throughout this group.  I just used whatever I had in my stash, but I had a rule about how I did that.

I always used one red yarn, one sparkly yarn and one orange yarn.

This group of yarn changes gradually throughout the length of the project in a rather subtle way since only one of the 3 will change at any given time.

 

Besides a balance of continuity and change, I try to pay a lot of attention to the yarn weights when I switch yarns out.  If you replace a thin yarn with a thick one, you will change the gauge (and thus the width!) of your blanket.  You may have made a stash buster blanket with wildly varying width. What happened is that you didn’t keep your yarn gauges consistent as you switched out your yarns.

The other thing I've started doing is crocheting an edging on my stash buster blankets.  The edges of these blankets can get a little floppy: especially the starting edge of the row. Edging the blanket helps balance out any width differences. Even more important, it just adds a nice frame to the controlled yarn mix chaos that unfolds within the blanket.


stash buster blanket

 

The edging you choose depends on your blanket. What finishing touch goes best with the blanket you make?  For this project, I like something that's simple and made with basic stitches. To me that’s in keeping with the spirit of the blanket project itself.  I think there's just so much going on in the body of the blanket, I want to put a nice frame on that. I also want to firm up the edges and add a little weight to them so my blanket drapes well over the edge of my sofa.

Make sure you have enough yarn to make the edging!  My approach is to use my “continuity yarns”and try to bring everything together.

So without further ado, here are edgings that I swatched with a little explanation for each. I'm still deciding and plan to swatch a little more. Based on what I've shown here, which one would you choose?


Edging Group 1

 

First, I did the simplest edgings possible: a row of single crochet.  The difference between the 2 photos is that the photo above is with the S hook (same size hook used in the project), and the bottom version is made with a hook that is half the size, working 2 stitches in every edge stitch.

 

Group 2

 

Then I played with ways of adding a second row to the first.

Top Edging: 2 rows of single crochet with the smaller hook.

Bottom Edging: 1 row of single crochet, 1 row of reverse single crochet with small hook. (compare to big hook below)

Even though my goal was to keep things simple, I decided that I really needed to spice these edges up.

 

group 3

 

I decided to throw more yarn into the mix.

Top edging: First row single crochet with big hook, 2nd row double crochet (double the stitches) with smaller hook and some orange/peach yarn, last row single crochet worked in between ever 2 dc.

Bottom edging: All done with the smaller hook, first row single crochet, 2nd row single crochet with the peach/red yarn and top row reverse single crochet.

It was after I did the bottom edging that I decided that my accent yarn needed to include the white eyelash and the red so that it blends well with the rest of the blanket.

 

 

Group 4

 

Here I'm beginning to experiment with the white eyelash and red accent yarns.  I'm also liking how the smaller hook and greater amount of stitches in the 2nd and 3rd rows of the edging adds an extra weight to the edge of the blanket.

Top Edging: First 2 rows done in single crochet with big hook.  Reverse single crochet with smaller hook and double the stitches for 3rd row.

 

Bottom Edging: It’s almost the same as the top edging. The only difference is that the 2nd row is also done with the smaller hook and double the stitches.  This gave the edging a little more substance.

____________________

Stay tuned - I'm finishing up the blanket now and will post how it turns out.  Any thoughts on these edgings?  Have you tried a Stash Buster Blanket of your own?  Let me know how you like to make them or if you had any challenges that you want to share.

Comments | Posted in Techniques & How To By Jennifer Hansen