Beaded Lucet Cord Lariat Necklace

There are so many ways to bead a lucet cord. My book, Learn to Lucet covers 2 different methods, but those two are just the tip of the iceberg.

In this cute necklace project, I show yet another way to create a beaded cord, this time with a beaded gimp cord.

I used scrap yarn and beads that I had laying around the house for this project. I love it when I create something new and fun to wear with components that had just been laying around collecting dust.

Scroll down below to see how I made it.


MATERIALS

For the cord:

DK Weight scrap yarn

Size 6/0 Seed Beads

Lucet

Steamer

 

To complete the lariat:

(2) beads with hole large enough to accommodate 4 strands of your DK yarn

(2) jump rings

Tapestry needle

Big Eye beading needle

(2) head pins

Round nose pliers

Beads of your choice to thread onto headpins to create the lariat dangles

Beaded Gimp Lucet Cord

 

Step 1- Make Beaded Gimp Cord: I made a 54” beaded gimp cord. To make the cord, I made a cord with 1 gimp with a small tweak to the process: I strung beads onto my gimp cord before using it.

I used the same yarn for both the gimp and the main cord. Since I use the no-turn method to make my cord and I followed a simple beading pattern.  Every other time I brought my gimp to the back, I scooted a bead up to be caught on the side of the lucet cord facing me.  In this way my beads are evenly spaced on every other strand facing the front of the work. One other key thing I did was to leave a 4” starting and ending tails for use later on when beading the ends.

 

Unblocked Beaded Lucet Cord

 

Step 2 - Block the cord: Don’t fret if your cord looks a little scraggly when it just comes off your lucet.  

 

Eurosteam blocking

 

Hit your cord with a little steam (my favorite is the EuroSteam) and any uneven stitches will normalize.

 

Blocked lucet gimp cord

 

If you are new to blocking or steam blocking, read my primer.

 

Beaded lucet cord end 

Step 3 - Start the beaded dongle: Using a big-eye beading needle, I threaded both strands of cord end through a small bead with a hole large enough to accommodate 4 strands total.

Beaded lucet cord end 2

 

Step 4 - Add jump ring: Thread the ends through the jump ring and then back up through the bead you added in step 3.


Lucet cord with jump ring

 

Step 5 - Finish attaching jump ring: Pull the ends of the lucet cord so that the bead and jump ring you added lie snug to the end of the lucet cord. Use your tapestry needle to weave the ends in through the lucet cord. Repeat on the other side.

 

Beaded Dangles for lucet cord 

Step 6 - Create dangles: Add beads of your choice to a head pin and attach them with round nose pliers to the jump ring.  Complete this for both ends of the lucet cord. I chose two different lengths of head pins and different combinations of beads for each end of the necklace.

 

Lariat Knot 

Step 7 - Carefully tie a knot : Hold the ends of the lariat together so that the bead side is facing you and there are no twists in the cord. Tie an overhand knot carefully so that the beaded side of the cord remains facing you to create an opening of about 38”. This will allow you to wear the lariat wrapped twice around your neck. Leave different length cord ends to hang below the knot, mine are 3 ½” and 7” (not including beaded dangles). Thread a length of the same yarn through your tapestry needle. Try on the necklace to make sure that you are able to fit the necklace part of the cord over your head then double-wrap over your head once more.  If you can’t do the double wrap, modify the position of your knot accordingly.

Have you worked beaded lucet cord yet? What have you made? Post photos and links in comments.

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Learn to Lucet

The most comprehensive guide to this ancient tool yet published!

Do more with the yarn you already have! Learn to use this ancient Viking cording tool to make strong and very sturdy cords that you can use in so many ways.

Make your knit and crochet projects even better. Use them to make drawstrings, lacings, buttons and embellishments for your knit and crochet projects. Also make jewelry, designer shoelaces, home improvement hacks and more with these strong cords.

Author Jennifer Hansen teaches you 6 fundamental cord types and give you full instructions for 8 fun, easy and useful lucet projects.

Learn more.